Top 10 Best 2pac Songs Of All Time (2019 update)

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Best 2pac Songs Of All Time

2 Pac is a popular musician from the United states, and we know him for some of the best hits like “only God can Judge Me.”This list guide we feature some of the top songs of all time by 2Pac that made the rapper be considered as one the greatest rappers in Hip Hop.

2Pac, who is also known as Tupac Amaru Shakur or simply Makaveli (From June 16, 1971, to September 13, 1996), was an American writer, rapper, and actor.

He was regarded by many people to be one of the greatest rappers of all time, and he became a central character in West Coast hip hop, injecting social issues in the class at a time when gangsta rap music was dominant in the mainstream media.

Pac’s double-disc album, named All Eyez on Me, which was officially released in 1996, became one of the best-selling music albums in the United States.

Much of Shakur’s musical work has been noted for discussing contemporary social problems that plagued inner cities, and he has deemed a symbol of resistance and activism against inequality in the society.

1. Only God Can Judge Me

In this music collaboration with his fellow Bay Area rapper Rappin’ 4-Tay, music “Only God Can Judge Me” discusses 2Pac describe his nature of mind in the outcome of his 1994 shooting at the Quad Studio in New York City, US.

On this song, Pac can even be listened predicting his own impending death, “I hear the doctor standing over by me, screaming I can make it /Got a body full of bullet holes layin here all naked /Still I, can’t breathe…”

Rappin’ 4-Tay told the HHDX Hip hop, “As a matter of fact, Suge Knight was simply looking for us. There was an APB out there on Tupac Shakur and Rappin’ 4-Tay. So to calm it Suge Knight down, when we did get into the studio, when we eventually made it back, we put together a hit song, ‘Only God Can Judge Me,’ and history was made.”

2. California Love ft Dr. Dre

“California Love” is a trending hip hop song by 2Pac starring Dr. Dre and Roger Troutman and was arguable as one of his most famous songs.

The tune was released as 2Pac’s comeback music single following his release from prison in mid-1995 and was his first single album as the newest artist of Death Row music Records.

“California Love” which topped at No.1 on Billboard’s Hot 100 sees 2Pac and rapper Dr. Dre rap about the various aspects that follow living the California lifestyle.

The song grounded during the height of the East Coast/West Coast struggle and helped to drive Death Row to the top of the Hip Hop music food chain.

2Pac described the song’s significance to him very clearly and also succinctly, “I don’t want it to be concerning violence. I want it to be about money.“

3. Me Against The World


The song“Me Against the World” is a tune from the self-titled third music studio album by American rapper 2Pac,

Recorded soon after his near-fatal murder attempt in New York and published while he was still in prison, this music album marked a change in 2Pac as a hip hop artist and a man.

Pac raps on issues of injustice and unfairness on, his lonesome fight against the world. The music rapper lets the audience look at the roots of his rage with less thuggin’ clouding the spectacle.

2Pac demonstrated that many of the songs were thoughtful of his own fears, “Me Against the World was deep, thoughtful. It was like a blues record. It was down-home. It was all my worries, all the things I just couldn’t sleep about.”

4. Dear Mama

“Dear Mama,” 2Pac’s ode to his dear mother Afeni Shakur, is pretty much the casual Mother’s Day hip-hop music anthem. The song is a recognition to his mother, Afeni Shakur.

In this song, Shakur details his youth poverty and his mother’s addiction to drugs, particularly crack cocaine but argues that his affection and deep respect for his mom supersede all the bad memories.

It was the third hip-hop scene ever (following Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five’s “The Message” and also the Public Enemy’s album, Fear of a Black Planet) to be installed in the Library of Congress.

Tupac’s mom, Afeni Shakur, died on May 2nd in 2016.

5. Breathin

The music“Breathin” was a single song on 2Pac’s posthumous music album Until The End Of Time.

This remix highlights the Outlawz, but the initial version of “Breathin’” is a 2Pac solo record and samples “Summer Breeze” by The Isley Brothers.

Tupac speaks on being the last one standing, “Bad Boy killer/ Finish my mission, my competition no longer beefin’/ I slew all them bustas, now I’m the last motherfucker breathin’.”

6. Changes

“Changes” is a hip hop tune by 2Pac featuring Talent and is a timely meditation on race, class, and politics. Shakur not only addresses the War on Drugs but as well as the War on Poverty.

The preponderance of the problems that he speaks about in his song is about matters that Huey Newton was trying to improve. Throughout the entire song, Shakur is addressing issues that are being designed to keep African-Americans suppressed in the United States.

The tune makes references to the war on drugs, the treatment of black population by the police at the time, segregation, the perpetuation of poverty and its accompanying vicious-cycle value practice in urban African American society, and the difficulties of life in the ghetto.

The chorus and piano are all sampled from “The Way It Is” by Bruce Hornsby and the Range and was moreover influenced by the late 1972 hit “Changes” by Black Sabbath

7. Keep Ya Head Up

The song “Keep Ya Head Up” is a late 1993 hit single by rapper 2Pac. The song stars R&B singer Dave Hollister and is committed to black women and Latasha Harlins.

Shakur’s commitment to the song never hesitated. “I think he s— that I say, no one else says,” the rapper told the Los Angeles Times in the year 1995. “Who was composing about black women before the ‘Keep Ya Head Up?’ Now everybody got a tune about black women.”

The beat is also sampled from Zapp’s “Be Alright,” and the popular chorus is obtained from The Five Stairsteps’ “O-oh Child.” It was initially released in Shakur’s 1993 music album named Strictly 4 My N.I.G.G.A.Z. He is later appearing following his death in 1998 in his Greatest music Hits compilation.

8. Life Goes On

The music “Life Goes On” is a single album from 2Pac’s music album All Eyez On Me. He gives tribute to his deceased friends, and further reflects on his own life, and possible death.

As per to the ‘’Making Of All Eyez On Me’‘ an article by XXL Mag, gang bangers listened to the song and cried. Through the terms of Johnny J, Tupac’s intimate friend, and a producer, ’‘we had people in gatherings, you want to call them street guys or just hardcore, they were deep into their thing – and they all broke down in tears.’’

9. Hit ‘Em Up

The song “Hit ‘Em Up” is a diss song by the hip hop artist 2Pac starring the Outlawz, a group affiliated with him. It is the B-side to the music single “How Do U Want It,” officially released on June 4, 1996.

In this trending song, 2Pac and the Outlawz threaten to kill Lil Cease, Biggie, Puff Daddy, and Mobb Deep; call Lil’ Kim rough and Biggie fat.

Reporter Chuck Philips, who examined Shakur at Can-Am, explained the song as “a caustic anti-East Coast campaign in which the rapper threatens to murder Biggie, Sean Combs (ie, Puffy), and a slew of Bad Boy artists and even other top New York acts.”

Also see: Music Review: Robert Michaels – Chrysalis Official

Tupac’s foremost reason for believing Bad Boy and his gunning down to be connected was that rappers Puff Daddy and Biggie were in the same New York record workshop as Tupac when he was shot to near death. Tupac maintained that “Who Shot Ya?” was evidence that Bad Boy genuinely sent his assassin.

10. Until The End Of Time

This musical version of “Until the End of Time” was officially released as a single song one month before the double record of the same name.

The record is based around a representation of Mr. Mister’s single 1985 single “Broken Wings” and the singer R.L. from the R&B group Next performs the chorus.

R.L. explained that his part in this song has initially been for Dave Hollister, who sang on 2Pac’s popular “Brenda’s Got a Baby.”

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